Past Life Patterns – The Victim

This is the description of one of the 16 Past Life Patterns. These patterns were developed by Karen Downing, in order to help you understand how past life experiences affect your life today. Each person carries 3 to 5 past life patterns in varying levels of influence. By understanding your unique mix of patterns, you can more easily build up your strengths and transform your challenges. Past life patterns are the key to uncovering your Soul Mission.

The Victim Description – The Victim can easily get into a behavioral cycle where they view themselves as the target for outside forces, people or conditions The Victim has lived many incarnations where they felt disempowered for a wide variety of reasons, and that belief is still held strongly in their life today. The Victim tends to give others both credit and blame, and often draws situations into their life that perpetuate their victimhood beliefs. You will know if you or someone you know expresses the Victim pattern, because the Victim focuses on the problems, instead of looking to solutions. The Victim is often someone who experiences the “worst luck” and no one can figure out how come everything seems to go wrong for them.

For example, if the Victim is looking for a new place to live, they will notice many things wrong (or with potential to go wrong) with the home. The Victim expects life to be problematic and of suffering; they have a difficult time believing that something can turn out well. So, in an attempt to feel like they are more secure in the process of life, the Victim will gather information on all the potential issues in order to avoid them. This tactic comes from a place of needing to feel safe and secure; the Victim is chasing those sensations, but never feels they really have in their life. The lesson for the Victim is to learn how they are contributing to the circumstances around them.

Some of the typical past life experiences of the Victim are: being the victim of a serious crime (theft, arson, rape, kidnapping and murder), being forced into slavery, experiencing abuse or mutilation, being jailed for a crime they did not commit, being in an accident that caused serious injury or death, losing their family or possessions by unexpected circumstances, and/or dying of starvation, neglect or malnutrition. If you ever worry about disaster, danger, something bad, or other negative outcomes so much that you have become overly stressed, worried, and anxious, than you exhibit the Past Life Pattern of the Victim.

Expression of the Victim Pattern in Your Life Now – The Victim lives their life in preparation for the next “disaster.” Their definition of disaster may not be the standard one, as they view any situation as having the potential to be disastrous. This is why the Victim is always prepared. They will be the individuals who have everything in their car or handbag, “just in case.” The Victim also has a tendency to ask many “what-if” questions. As in, “what if this or that happens?” The Victim, despite what they have been through in past lives, typically has a very open heart, and wishes for themselves and others to seek out contentment and happiness. However, this wanting and wishing for others can cause them to become out of balance when giving advice. If you express the Victim pattern, you have to be watchful of how you give advice, as it can tend to be about taking action on assumptions and jumping to conclusions. For example, if your friend is dating someone, and they have a bad phone conversation with this person, you will be more inclined to tell your friend to abandon the budding relationship, instead of using the conversation as a tool to learn about communication as a couple. Extreme expressions of the Victim pattern can lead to unhealthy emotional detachment, phobias and paranoia.

There are two ways that the Victim theme reveals itself; The Passive Victim and the Proactive Victim. If you resonate with The Victim pattern, you might discover that you can possess qualities of one, or even both, of the ways that The Victim is expressed. Often in one area of life you can feel one way, and in another area of life feel another way.

The Passive Victim – The Passive Victim tends to be shy and fearful of making deep connections with others. They need to take new situations and relationships very slowly, as this helps them to feel as though they can be more in control of avoiding potential negative outcomes. The Passive Victim exhibits a great deal of avoidance in their life, not wishing to discuss or address issues that they consider to be difficult. The biggest lesson for the Passive Victim is to recognize that they are the central figure in their own life.

The Proactive Victim – The Proactive Victim is what people often call a “Negative Nelly.” It seems like they can pinpoint the negatives of every situation. They are called the Proactive Victim, because of their need to identify the problems, before those problems could arise. Because of this nature, they can be forceful of their opinions and feel a need to defend themselves. They hold onto vast caverns of anger from so many past lives of mistreatment. The Proactive Victim’s biggest lesson is to understand is that it is impossible to anticipate every possibility. Once they stop focusing on anticipating problems, they will realize they have a much better handle on in their life than they once thought.

Past Life Pattern Breakdown:

  • Expects the worst in nearly every situation
  • Does not fully recognize their role in their own life
  • Tends to jump to conclusions
  • Focuses on problems instead of solutions

Affirmation – “I will not repeat the circumstances of my past. I move into the future, knowing that I participate in my reality. I no longer need to hold onto my expectations of negative situations.”

Learn more about how the Victim pattern is showing up in your life by enrolling in the On-Demand video course, Exploring Past Life Patterns.

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